Maybelle Carter Blog

Did you realize that religious participation can offer higher levels of physical and mental prosperity in seniors, as opposed to non-religious seniors? Medical benefits have been linked to regular religious practices. Participation was correlated with: 

  1. A better, more positive mood
  2. Lower levels of depression and anxiety
  3. Recovered from illness or disease more quickly

Studies report that:

Religious seniors that attend religious services on a weekly basis, were described “very happy” at 45%, as compared to those who never attend at 28%.

Non-religious seniors reported to be “very unhappy” ranked at 4%, as compared to religious seniors at 2%.

Offering the feeling of self and social identity, 67% of seniors said that having religion in their lives offers more social fulfillment.

Out of the majority of seniors studied, statistics revealed that religion is the means of navigating through life’s difficulties, for example, the loss of a spouse or mobility.

The takeaway? These statistics that tie happiness and health to religion holds true. The correlation is clear, but the explanation of “why” for this relationship is less clear.

Nashville Alzheimer's careRegardless of the reason one thing is clear, we welcome all religious practice for the overall health of our community. This may incorporate nearby church organizations, neighborhood Catholic officials administering fellowship to parishioners, and honoring holy days, for example, Hanukkah for our Jewish occupants.

For many people, religion is not just a matter of spirituality but also a means of social connection. Many residents still attend church services or their pastor will make home-bound visits at communities to let seniors know they are still important to a church family, even if they are no longer able to make the service each week because of poor health or mobility issues. 

In senior care facilities, meeting the needs of seniors comes with the job. However, at Maybelle Carter, we like to go above and beyond for our senior residents and staff, providing more than assisted or memory care. We can also guarantee the best religious and spiritual care through congregational services, worship, learning, and prayer. Living in senior retirement with neighbors that share the same or a similar religious belief can furthermore excel happiness, growth, and health. That is what we're about at Regency – giving the best opportunities and care to our senior community.

At Maybelle Carter, faith is commonly known as our cornerstone. Being a Christian organization, we urge the practice of religion, regardless of belief or culture. If you’re looking for a senior living community to meet your religious needs, take a visit through our facility and spend the day to get to know our staff and residents. Better yet get the full experience, and join in the fun at one of our activities or events. Call us to schedule your next visit us today. We are happy to welcome you and your family to our Maybelle Carter family!

Written by: Katie Hanley

There are many great reasons for retirees to visit or relocate to the Madison area, but one key to the quality of life here is the rich abundance of things for seniors to see and do in Nashville, TN – many of the activities at a reduced price for seniors, or free. 

Here in Madison, veteran residents often enjoy paying tribute to the fallen soldiers at the Nashville National Cemetery. It is a humbling experience to visit the monuments of the service men and women who so bravely fought, dating back to the Civil War Era. A quiet afternoon stroll through the greenway allows time for reflection and gratitude, while also enjoying a breath of fresh air and exercise. It’s a wonderful place to visit, especially on Memorial Day to see each grave decorated with small patriotic flags.

Looking for some good, ol’ fashioned bluegrass music? Look no further than Larry's Grand Ole Garage & Blue Grass Music Park. As many would describe this hole in the wall dive as Madison’s hidden gem, it offers family-friendly, foot-stomping music in true Southern style! Here, seniors and their families can enjoy good music, good food, and an overall good time. 

We’re about 15 minutes from Downtown Nashville, which offers a wealth of things to see and do. The major attractions are:

Nashville retirement community

Cheekwood Botanical Gardens and Museum of Art – Nestled in the foliage of the Tennessee hills, browse through the 55-acre historical estate, an elegant Georgian-style mansion surrounded byspectacular gardensDon’t miss the garden-scale, outdoor train made entirely from materials found in nature. Bridges and cedar mountains make this exhibit fun for the whole family! Admission to the inside is $8 for adults, $7 for seniors, $4 for youth, and free for children 2 or under. 

Grand Ole Opry – Seniors and their families can enjoy a piece of country music history at the Grand Ole Opry, which began as a broadcast radio station in 1925. Since then, the iconic home of American music has hosted country music legends, award-winning artists, and defined the Nashville music scene. 

Ryman Auditorium – This performance hall has seen the likes of artists such as Elvis Presley, Paul Simon, and B.B. King. The Ryman is a tried and true testament of how one stage can connect us all through toe-tapping tunes. Visit the home where bluegrass music was born for a guided or self-guided tour today. 

Belle Meade Plantation  – A 34-acre Southern plantation with a name that literally translates to beautiful meadow is sure to not disappoint. The estate was founded by John Harding in 1807. Today, the grounds are a part of Tennessee’s historic architecture preservation and equestrian education. Visitors are welcome to tour the property, as well as shop, dine, and enjoy wine tastings. Tours begin every 30 minutes. Adults 65+ ask about their senior admission discount!

Nashville Showboat – All Aboard The Nashville Riverboat General Jackson to experience the city in an elegant “Old South” style. Carving through the banks of the Cumberland River, this luxury riverboat is reminiscent of the Victorian Era, offers stunning views, a delicious, freshly prepared meal, and entertainment.   

Lane Motor Museum – Calling all automotive enthusiasts! Take a tour of Nashville’s beloved automotive collection. During your tour, you will spot restored and uniquely different automobiles, as well as motorcycles, aviation machines, and even some amphibious crafts. Lane Motor Museum isone of the few displays to specialize in sporty, European models. 

John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge – Also known as the Shelby Street Bridge, this 3,150-foot-long iconic pedestrian bridge spans the Cumberland riverbanks, as one of the largest pedestrian bridges in the world. There’s no charge to visit this popular walking spot. There are benches along the way for those who need to stop and rest while enjoying the view of the river and the people enjoying their day. 

Senior discounts are available at select hotels, retail stores, restaurants, and grocery stores near these attractions. At Maybelle Carter Senior Living, we arrange for our residents to participate in group outings to local attractions. Being part of a group of peers living together in Nashville Assisted Living makes for a great way to experience these sights and sounds. 

To learn more about things for seniors to do in Nashville TN, visit http://www.visitmusiccity.com/visitors

Written by: Katie Hanley

The holiday season is upon us! Time to break out the Christmas decorations, string lights, eggnog, and cozy winter sweaters. ‘Tis the season to be merry! Christmas is a wonderful opportunity to spend time with family. However, for many seniors, the holidays are often thought of as confusing, stressful, and in some cases saddening, especially in those suffering from seasonal depression or the loss of a loved one. Make this Christmas season special for the entire family by contributing these 5 tips to happier holiday and add more joy for the senior in your life:

Nashville retirement communities

1. Take a trip down memory lane. Stories are a great way to engage with seniors, as they have quite a few. As you spend time with your senior loved ones, ask them questions like, what were your family traditions when you were younger? Comparing differences and similarities is a great way to bond over Christmas dinner. Seniors love to share memories of happy times. Likewise, it can be great for the youngsters to hear about what it was like when the seniors were their age. 

2. Cherish your time. Always cherish the seniors in your life and make quality time for them, especially during the holidays. At Regency, we encourage families and friends to spend time together. Whether that be a Christmas dinner, a drive out to see the magical winter lights, nativity scenes, or a candlelight church service. Just remember to have fun, chances are they will, too! Just a few minutes of uninterrupted, quality time is a lifetime of appreciation and happiness for seniors. 

3. Recognize Depression. Experiencing some degree of depression around the holidays is extremely common in aging seniors. If you believe that the senior in your life might be experiencing seasonal depression this Christmas, we encourage you to make time for them. Don’t ignore the warning signs – let us know how your Regency family can help in any way! 

4. Be mindful. For many seniors suffering from memory loss, the holidays can be confusing time. Be mindful that they may not remember certain past events or sometimes even names or how they are related. Use caution to not make them feel anxious or elevate confusion when they are experiencing a memory lapse. If it appears they do not remember, simply share the memory with everyone. Chances are they may not be the only one to have forgotten. 

5. Ask them to help out in some small way. Our senior residents love getting the chance to help, even if their contribution is small. Include them so they feel needed by asking for a helpful hand or words of wisdom this holiday season. Give them the task of setting the dinner table, stirring the gravy, or if your senior is in a wheelchair, they can help out by peeling the potatoes. You can also include them in the traditional lighting of the Christmas tree. Gather the family around to watch the illumination kick off the holiday season. While many seniors are unable due to physical limitations, there are still many ways even older folks can help with. 

Whatever the season holds for you, Regency Senior Living is honored to celebrate these special times with you and your family. 

Written by: Katie Hanley

Friday, 30 September 2016 18:25

Bridging the Gap Between Generations

Nashville senior living communityNot only does intergenerational activity pass along knowledge and wisdom, it can lead to longer, healthier lives. While finding common ground may be a bit of a challenge, it can be rewarding for all ages. Studies have proven this interaction reduces isolation and poverty among seniors while enabling them to serve as mentors for younger adults.

As Margaret Mead states, “Somehow we have to get older people back close to growing children if we are to restore a sense of community, a knowledge of the past, and a sense of the future.”

Here are a few tips for intergenerational activity:

Keep an Open Mind
Seniors and grandchildren alike can learn a lot from each other if both parties keep an open mind and appreciate the unique opportunities and challenges that can accompany the interactions.

Respect Differences
Differences in generations can also bring a collision of values. It is important to respect the variances in lifestyle and belief. When individuals come together, inaccurate and negative stereotypes are broken. As organizational development scholar Dr. Morris Massey said, “We don’t have to agree with the values of different generations, but we can strive to understand the mind-sets of different generations and how each group sees the world based on their experiences.”

Find Common Ground
Both seniors and those from Generation X can relate to the impact a downturned economy played on their lives. Baby Boomers were most likely influenced by parents who grew up during the Great Depression. That provides common ground for younger generations who struggled with a double digit inflation and a challenging job market.

Stay Flexible
Bridging the differences of age and beliefs requires flexibility in actions and thinking. The Charmm’d Foundation offers more tips in staying flexible and communicating with other generations at http://www.charmmdfoundation.org/resource-library/effective-communication/checklist-communicating-different-generations.

Differing generations can become advocates for one another to provide solutions for illiteracy, crime prevention, health and environmental issues. Generations United provides that intergenerational activities allow seniors to remain active and engaged. This interaction results in longer life spans with better mental and physical health while keeping them engaged in their communities.

Research from the organization also stated, “Older adults who regularly volunteer with children burn 20% more calories per week, experience fewer falls, are less reliant on canes and perform better on a memory test than their peers. Older adults with dementia experience more positive effect during interactions with children.”

Wednesday, 31 August 2016 20:01

Learn the Key to Living a Longer, Happier Life

Everyone searches for the key to happiness throughout life, and everyone also seems to have differing opinions on what that key is. Is it family? A loving partnership or marriage? Wealth? Actually, it turns out that it is a combination of these – having a wealth of good relationships is the real key to living a long, happy life. Nashville retirement facility

In 1938, Harvard University started a study, and began tracking 724 men. These men came from a variety of backgrounds ranging from college students to men living in some of Boston’s poorest neighborhoods. The researchers initially interviewed these men about their lives, medically examined their brains and did blood work, and continued this process every 2 years. The majority of the surviving men from the study are now in their 90s.

After 75 years of research, there are now some solid clues that can help piece the happiness puzzle together. Harvard Professor of Psychology, Robert Waldinger, is now the 4th director of the study and says that those who lead healthier lives also have strong social bonds which protect their mental and physical health over the long-term. In contrast, individuals with health problems have a higher probability of becoming isolated which can lead to unhappiness in old age.

This seems like a fairly simple concept…stay healthy and make friends. However, consider the various phases of life and making friends: when we are in school, there is a built in network of individuals to choose to build relationships with; when we enter the workforce, our careers provide opportunity to form even more relationships. 

What happens when we retire though, and our colleagues/friends move on or become out of touch? Waldinger suggests that happiness is more likely for healthy seniors who make an effort to build new relationships after retirement. A person who is connected with friends, family and their community will tend to live a healthier, happier life than a person who is less connected.

The study also found that there were connections between mental unhappiness in younger years (caused by unhappy relationships) and physical pain in later years. For instance, some people reported that their physical pain at age 80 was magnified due to their emotional pain at age 50. This is why H. Jackson Brown Jr. said that who you marry determines, “90% of your happiness or misery.”

Even though romance may be hard to maintain in a relationship that lasts for generations, the study suggested that individuals who argued with their partner regularly had sharper memories.  This was dependent upon the individual feeling that they could count on their partner in tough times, suggesting that secure relationships help strengthen the brain.

What role does an Assisted Living Community, like Maybelle Carter, play in this?

When a senior moves into this type of community, they are not isolated. The community fosters a healthy balance of freedom and privacy with an environment designed to help create and grow social connections. There are planned outings, games, meals, and a variety of great physical activities that are planned by staff in order to nurture the mental and physical health of residents.

Even though the prospect of moving to an Assisted Living Community can be scary at first, the majority of people feel like they belong with their new “family” within a few weeks of getting settled in. Some even discover that they are not as shy as they thought, and find a new freedom by spreading their social wings! These types of strong social bonds can play a very important role in long-term physical and mental health, according to research.

To learn more about Maybelle Carter, call us at (844) 602-2602. 

Written by Kristen Camden

Published in Retirement Communities

When is the “right” time to move a loved one into an Assisted Living Community, such as Maybelle Carter? That question is not easily answered for many seniors or their loved ones, as the topic can be a great source of conflict. However, once an aging family member or loved one is unable to live alone, the topic becomes unavoidable.

The great news is that even though this life-changing decision can be scary, many Maybelle Carter residents tell us, “I wish I had done this years ago.” Think of the process in terms of the nervousness a high school graduate feels when they are transitioning from living at home to going off to college and living in a dorm room. The feelings of being home sick and anxious about an unfamiliar place and people are normal in both cases. Nashville assisted living

There is a misconception among some that Assisted Living communities are cold and sterile, like a hospital. This notion may be attributed to nursing homes, which focus primarily on providing residents with skilled medical care. In reality, Assisted Living communities offer seniors their own apartment, complete with a staff to help with housekeeping, laundry, and daily reminders that may be needed for medications. They also offer residents the freedom to come and go freely, delicious meals provided in a social dining room, and activities that are planned by the facility.

Even as great as the idea may sound and be presented, a loved one that is aging could adamantly refuse to leave the home that they live in, which may hold sentimental value or attachments. However, the discussion does not necessarily have to be negative if it is approached with open and honest communication.

It is suggested by experts that children and family share their concerns with their aging parent, provide options, and then listen to how their loved one feels. This method is far healthier and more beneficial to all parties involved, as opposed to dictating when and what changes will be made. Another reason why it is important to encourage, and discuss the benefits of, moving to an Assisted Living Community is to avoid the topic being forced by worsening health or an incident.

Once the topic has been discussed, take time to visit and learn about various communities to see which one is the best fit and most liked by the parent. Things to consider are the location, along with what services and activities are offered.

Even though the idea of moving out of their home may be met with negativity, they would much rather be part of the process and have a choice of where they will be living, if the time comes. For many, settling on Maybelle Carter’s Assisted Living Community is due to the family-like atmosphere, as much as the activities and amenities offered.

The peace of mind that comes along with knowing a loved one is cared for, balanced with the senior’s need and want for social interaction and independence, is what is offered at Maybelle Carter.
These are just a few considerations when discussing or moving an aging or disabled loved one into an Assisted Living Community.

To learn more about Maybelle Carter, call us at (844) 602-2602. 

Written by Kristen Camden

Published in Retirement Communities
Friday, 27 May 2016 18:16

Ways Aging Can Impact the Body

It is difficult to prepare for all of the changes that impact your body as you age. Youth can give a false sense of confidence and lead to living life in a reckless way for some; others may live their entire life cautiously in order to avoid or prepare for the inevitable changes that will happen to the body later in life.

In a society that has seen a vast increase in obesity, more than a third of all adults are considered to be obese. Partially, this is due to an increase in sedentary lifestyles. The British Journal of Sports Medicine published a study in 2011 which found a link in decreased life expectancy in people over 25 years of age who sat and watched TV. For every hour spent in front of the television, there was a 22 minutes deduction in overall life expectancy among these adults.

Being aware of these factors and how they impact future health is a start. However, being and staying physically active, and taking charge of overall health are key to the management of future well-being, according to the National Institute on Aging.Nashville elderly care

Here are a few major age-related changes that a majority of older adults will face, and how to prepare for them:

  1. Brain Function
    Issue: Age-related memory loss is common among seniors, but it is important to distinguish between normal forgetfulness and signs of dementia, including Alzheimer’s.
    Solution: While there is no clear cause of Alzheimer’s that has been determined by scientists, they do believe that there are certain environmental and lifestyle factors, along with genetics and complex brain changes, that can affect people differently. For instance, the misuse of alcohol may increase brain damage risk, as well as negatively impact other parts of the body.
  2. Skin
    Issue: Overexposure to the sun throughout life can lead to many things, including age spots, wrinkles, and skin cancer. Also, people over age 50 who had chickenpox during their life may suffer from shingles. Other factors that impact the skin are toxins, stress, and dehydration.
    Solution: A good rule of thumb is to always protect the skin when it is exposed to sun, and be cognizant of dehydration. There is also a shingles vaccine available now to help boost the immune system against the virus.
  3. Bladder/Prostate
    Issue: Various forms of incontinence, the involuntary release of urine, are common in older people, particularly women. For men, the prostate gets larger with age, making it more difficult to release urine.
    Solution: While you should speak to your doctor about medicines available to help control incontinence, being proactive is also important. Drinking less caffeine and more water can help improve overall bladder health.
  4. Eyes/Ears
    Issue: Vision impairment issues and changes slowly begin to surface around the age of 40. You may notice that it is difficult or impossible to read small print without an aid such as reading glasses. Presbycusis is a hearing condition which causes a decline in ability to hear.
    Solution: While vision loss in seniors is inevitable, having annual eye exams can help detect early signs of eye disorders, such as glaucoma and cataracts. Quality of hearing can be improved with hearing aids, but being mindful of exposure to loud noises in younger years is also important.

Other age-related changes include: Balance issues, loss of teeth, bone and joint weakness, and digestive/metabolic system problems. These are just a few of the keys to help aging adults live a long, healthy life. Check with your doctor before making any changes that can affect your physical or mental health.

Donald A.B. Lindberg, M.D., the Former Director of the National Library of Medicine believes, “Good information is the best medicine for older adults. NIHSeniorHealth can help seniors find answers to their medical questions from the comfort of their own homes thanks to this new and innovative online resource and the Internet." 

To learn more, visit http://www.nihseniorhealth.gov.

Maybelle Carter has a range of services, from Independent Living to Memory Care, in order to fit the needs of each individual resident. To learn more about Maybelle Carter, call us at (844) 602-2602. 

Written by Kristen Camden

Published in Active Senior Living
Wednesday, 30 March 2016 16:58

Spring Activities for Seniors in Nashville

Spring signals a time for growth renewal through warmer weather, trees and flowers blooming, and outdoor activities! Everyone enjoys the change in seasons for these reasons, and especially since spring provides a chance to get out of the winter slump and cold that many experience. 

Executive Director at Maybelle Carter, Jennifer Todd, agrees that, “Spring is here and we know our gardeners are just itching to get out to the garden and start digging in the soil and let the April showers bring the beautiful May flowers!”

While not every senior has the same level of mobility in order to get outside and fully enjoy the great outdoors, simply sitting in the garden and soaking up some Vitamin D can be equally as important. Research has shown that Vitamin D produced from sunlight can improve cognitive function. However, it is also very important to protect yourself from prolonged sun exposure, as it can cause harm to the skin, dehydration, and exhaustion. If you do plan to take advantage of the warmer weather and sunshine, take precautions: wear sunscreen and a hat, drink plenty of water, and take time to rest and cool down.

Some exciting FREE activities planned in Nashville for spring are:

  • Edgehill Rocks – April 2nd (10am-6pm):
    This exciting outdoor music, art, and food celebration takes place throughout Edgehill Village on Villa Place.
  • Art Goes Alternative April 3rd (11am-6pm):
    For art lovers, this pop-up art exhibit will take place at The Rosewall. The pet-friendly event will feature live music and artwork from over 30 artists.
  • Nashville Cherry Blossom Festival – April 9th (9am-5pm):
    The 8th annual Cherry Blossom Festival is a Japanese cultural event that should not be missed by nature lovers, and will take place in Public Square Park.
  • Earth Day Festival – April 23rd (11am-6pm):
    The Nashville Earth Day Festival will take place at Centennial Park this year, and will feature educational booths, speakers, and workshops. It will also feature environmentally friendly vendors and live entertainment!
  • Crafty Nashville – May 7th (10am-4pm):
    This arts and crafts fair will be held at Track One and will feature over 70 artisans and crafters, with live music and food trucks!
  • Sevier Park Fest – May 6th & 7th (10am-6pm):
    This is the 4th annual Sevier Park Fest, which will be located in Sevier Park and the 12 South neighborhood. There will be art, food, music, fashion, and more!

Additionally, there are plenty of activities that you can plan and take part in on your own, depending on your hobbies, interests, and mobility. Some of these can be enjoyed outdoors or indoors, in case the heat is too intense to be outside.

Here are just a few examples:Nashville senior housing

  • Work on a garden
  • Go fishing
  • Take walks
  • Visit a local Farmer’s Market
  • Take up bird watching
  • Spring clean, and discard old items
  • Take the grandchildren to a park or baseball game

Don’t forget to take all the precautions necessary to prevent heat stroke and exhaustion, as you make the most of the warmer weather! Wear light clothing, avoid being outside at the peak heat hours, stay hydrated, and listen to your body. If you need to take a break and seek air-conditioning, do so. You can always get back out and enjoy the weather once you feel more energized.

These are just a few tips to enhance your enjoyment of springtime as the weather transitions to the humid summer in the Deep South.

To learn more about Maybelle Carter, call us at (844) 602-2602. 

Written by Kristen Camden

Published in Active Senior Living

There are many reasons that Nashville, TN is a popular city to visit, and also to live in. Labeled as the Music City, Nashville has always been a popular tourist destination, known for its country music and active night life. 

What makes Nashville so appealing to retiring seniors who want to find new and interesting ways to spend their hard-earned time though? A few options to entertain and help fulfill any retiree’s day are:

  • Enjoy the beautiful 55 acre scenery at the Cheekwood Botanical Garden & Museum of Art
  • Take a trip to the Nashville Zoo at Grassmere and visit with owls, giraffes, kangaroos, and more.  This is a great outing to invite grandchildren along as well!
  • Learn while having fun, at the Adventure Science Center, or the First Center for the Visual Arts
  • Visit the Nashville Public Library to catch up on some reading
  • See the replica of the Athenian Parthenon

Retirement home Nashville TNFor music lovers, there are a multitude of options as well, including:

  • The Grand Ole Opry
  • Ryman Auditorium
  • Opryland
  • Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
  • Schermerhorn Symphony Center

Every month, there are also many opportunities to stay active and involved, right at Maybelle Carter. This month alone, the Adventure Club plans to “visit” Ireland and The Holy Land; there will be a St. Patrick’s Day Shindig; there will be an evening of music and singing with Kathy Johnson, and also a lunch outing to a local eatery!

According to TopRetirements.com, many seniors are choosing to retire in Nashville for a multitude of reasons. The region has low taxes, a mild climate, and an abundance of health care services, which is paramount for any senior making a decision on where to retire. In addition to the multitude of entertainment options, many are free, low cost, and even offer senior discounts so be sure to ask about them!

Maybelle Carter’s dedication to its residents’ wellbeing and happiness is the perfect complement to an already amazing city’s vast array of activities and fun.  To learn more about what Maybelle Carter Senior Living and Retirement Community, call (844) 602-2602, or visit our community 208 West Due West Avenue, Madison, TN.


Written by Kristen Camden

Published in Active Senior Living
Friday, 29 August 2014 13:19

Adventures Abound in Nashville Outings

Nashville retirement livingOur campus sits on 7 beautiful acres where we garden, play shuffleboard and horseshoes, walk on the walking track and enjoy grilling out. We have watercolor painting classes, wii bowling tournaments, musical entertainers, and card & board games. Indeed, there's no shortage of ways to enjoy life here among one another.

But Maybelle Carter is located in Madison. This means we are fortunate to be surrounded by the Nashville Metropolitan area, which provides us with many interesting adventures. Maybelle Carter bus outings take us to a variety of places.

"We're 5 minutes from the OpryLand Hotel, Grand Ole Opry House, General Jackson Show Boat and the Opry Mills shopping mall," explained Jennifer Todd of Maybelle Carter. "Just minutes away is Nashville proper, which includes attractions such as the Parthenon, the Country Music Hall of Fame, Ryman Auditorium, the Farmer's Marketing, the Nashville Symphony, Nashville Ballet, Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Cheekwood Botanical Gardens, the Nashville Zoo and Loveless Café."

Our bus outings take us to grocery stores, Wal-Mart, dollar stores, Opry Mills, The Mall at Green Hills and Rivergate Mall, as well as restaurants and Summer Crest Winery. Nashville is also home to Goo Goo Cluster candy and Moon Pies. "East Nashville offers one-of-a-kind shopping and restaurants like The Pharmacy and 5 Points Pizza – our residents dine there occasionally," she said.

Faith is also an important part of most seniors' lives. Our area is home to 75 churches of varied denominations.

"Pro sports are big here as well," she said. "Our teams include the Tennessee Titans (football), Nashville Predators (hockey), and Nashville Sounds (minor league baseball)."

Being in the South, antebellum mansions also provide fascinating destinations for residents to go sight-seeing on outings. "Southern mansions include Andrew Jackson's home, The Hermitage, as well as BelleMeade Plantation, Belmont Mansion and Two Rivers Mansion," Todd said.

Maybelle Carter provides all of the comfort and security of small town community with all of the great adventures offered by our proximity to a major American city.

Page 1 of 2

Request Information